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Health


  • You Want To Quit Smoking? – This Powerful Natural Remedy Will Help You Do That!

     

    It is common knowledge that smoking is detrimental for the health. Therefore, giving up smoking can significantly improve one’s well being. Unfortunately, cigarettes are filled with carcinogens that are harmful not only to the smoker, but to the passive smokers as well.

     

    Nevertheless, giving up smoking is not an easy task, and everyone who has tried it, knows what it entails. Hence, according to an article in Psychology Today, most of those who tried to quit smoking, relapsed within a year period. On the market, there are numerous patches and drugs that help people quit smoking, however, not all of them are useful. As written at merriliynhope.com, and held by Richard Webster who has devoted many years in helping people with behavioral problems and smoking addiction, baking soda is a potent remedy for quitting smoking as it immediately prevents the smoker from lighting up his/her next cigarette.

     

    Procedure: Every time you feel the need for a cigarette, sprinkle some soda onto the tongue.

    Important to know:

    • People who are on a specific low sodium diet or people who experience high blood pressure should avoid this method.
    • Baking soda should not be taken indefinitely.
    • Never replace a healthy alkaline diet with baking soda.

    To sum up, use this cure for several weeks, and then make a pause from couple of weeks before you start with the method again if you have not succeeded in quitting already. Surplus amounts of baking soda can sometimes lead to problems with the kidneys.

     

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  • Guess Which Of These Bananas Is Better For You— Ripe Or Unripe?

    Did you know? The nutritional properties of the bananas hanging in your kitchen actually change as they grow riper. As they ripen, bananas become sweeter. Why? Because there are enzymes in the banana that begin to break down starches (which aren’t generally sweet) into sugar. This also makes the banana easier for your gut to digest!

    Japanese researchers recently discovered something fascinating about bananas; as a banana ripens, it produces more antioxidants than its fresher brethren contain. When the banana has dark spots on the peel, it produces what’s called TNF, or Tumor Necrosis Factor, a substance that combats cancer and abnormal cells. The darker the spots, the more powerful the banana is at killing cancer cells. A ripe banana is eight times more effective in boosting the body’s immune system than a fresh banana is.

    So the best time to eat a banana? When it’s as ripe as possible (I know, the patience required is almost as challenging as waiting for ripe avocados.)

    Additionally, it’s worth noting, if you suffer from type 2 diabetes, you may want to eat a ripe banana with nut butter. The fats in the nut butter will slow down sugar absorption in your blood stream so it doesn’t hit you all at once, making it easier for your body to break down.

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  • Four Minutes a Day For Just One Month and You Can Change Your Body Forever. Here’s How!

    It doesn’t take a full-time gym membership to completely change how your body looks, many people know that these days but what you may not know is that it only takes four minutes!

     

    It’s the 28-day plank challenge courtesy of Women Daily Magazine, and it will not only change the way you look, but will increase your total endurance and strength level as the cherry on top. At first you start planking for 20 seconds on day 1. Easy enough right? But then …

    Here’s the plan:

    Day 1 – 20 seconds
    Day 2 – 20 seconds
    Day 3 – 30 seconds
    Day 4 – 30 seconds
    Day 5 – 40 seconds
    Day 6 – rest
    Day 7 – 45 seconds
    Day 8 – 45 seconds
    Day 9 – 60 seconds
    Day 10 – 60 seconds
    Day 11 – 60 seconds
    Day 12 – 90 seconds
    Day 13 – rest


    Day 14 – 90 seconds
    Day 15 – 90 seconds
    Day 16 – 120 seconds
    Day 17 – 120 seconds
    Day 18 – 150 seconds
    Day 19 – rest
    Day 20 – 150 seconds
    Day 21 – 150 seconds
    Day 22 – 180 seconds
    Day 23 – 180 seconds
    Day 24 – 210 seconds
    Day 25 – rest
    Day 26 – 210 seconds
    Day 27 – 240 seconds
    Day 28 – Until failure

    If there’s anything important you take from this exercise it should be the proper body positioning. Without that then you’re not taking away everything from doing this that you could, and when you go to do something you deserve to be able to do it right!

     

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  • Having too much intercourse could cause genitals to change shape - with males getting bigger

    A study from scientists in the University of Exeter shows the changes happen over generations.

     

    Males and females who have too much sexual intercourse could see a change in the shape of their genitals, according to a new study.

     

    The research involves burying beetles, and offers evidence that mating can cause males to grow longer penis-like organs and females larger ‘claws’ on their genitalia.

     

    The changes can show within ten generations of beetles, according to scientists at the University of Exeter .

     

    Genital shape varies enormously across the animal kingdom compared, for instance, to body shape.

     

    The paper, published in the journal Evolution, suggests this is because shapes of male and female genitalia co-evolve as a result of what they term 'sexual conflict'.

     

    Author Dr Megan Head said: “It takes two to tango, so when changes in shape in one sex leads to corresponding changes in the other sex this is known as co-evolution.”

     

    Although males benefit from mating, as it increases the number of offspring they are likely to produce, it's negative for females, because they only need to mate a few times to fertilise all their eggs.

     

    In addition too much sex can be costly for female burying beetles as it reduces their ability to provide parental care.

     

    To test whether sexual conflict could lead to co-evolutionary changes in the shape of genitals, researchers artificially selected pairs of burying beetles for either high mating rates or low rates for ten generations.
    The research found that this artificial selection resulted in changes in the shapes of both male and female genitalia.

     

    It also found that changes in one sex were reflected by changes in the shape of the other sex, showing there was co-evolution.

     

    The greatest changes in shape occurred in beetles selected for high mating rates, where sexual conflict was greatest: males evolved to have longer intromittent organs - penis-like structures - and females responded by evolving more pronounced ‘claws’ on their genitalia.
    Dr Paul Hopwood, of the University of Exeter, reveals: “Although we don’t know the ins and outs of how these genital structures relate to the reproductive success of each sex, our results show that sexual conflict over mating can lead to co-evolutionary changes in the shape of the genitals of burying beetles.”

     

    “Our research demonstrates the general importance of conflicts of interest between males and females in helping to generate some of the biodiversity that we see in the natural world.

     

    "It’s fascinating how genital evolution can happen so fast – in ten generations – showing how rapidly evolutionary changes can occur.”

     

    Read more »
  • Having too much wesib could cause genitals to change shape - with males getting bigger size

     

    A study from scientists in the University of Exeter shows the changes happen over generations.

     

    Males and females who have too much sexual intercourse could see a change in the shape of their genitals, according to a new study.

     

    The research involves burying beetles, and offers evidence that mating can cause males to grow longer penis-like organs and females larger ‘claws’ on their genitalia.

     

    The changes can show within ten generations of beetles, according to scientists at the University of Exeter .

     

    Genital shape varies enormously across the animal kingdom compared, for instance, to body shape.

     

    The paper, published in the journal Evolution, suggests this is because shapes of male and female genitalia co-evolve as a result of what they term 'sexual conflict'.

     

    Author Dr Megan Head said: “It takes two to tango, so when changes in shape in one sex leads to corresponding changes in the other sex this is known as co-evolution.”

     

    Although males benefit from mating, as it increases the number of offspring they are likely to produce, it's negative for females, because they only need to mate a few times to fertilise all their eggs.

     

    In addition too much sex can be costly for female burying beetles as it reduces their ability to provide parental care.

     

    To test whether sexual conflict could lead to co-evolutionary changes in the shape of genitals, researchers artificially selected pairs of burying beetles for either high mating rates or low rates for ten generations.
    The research found that this artificial selection resulted in changes in the shapes of both male and female genitalia.

     

    It also found that changes in one sex were reflected by changes in the shape of the other sex, showing there was co-evolution.

     

    The greatest changes in shape occurred in beetles selected for high mating rates, where sexual conflict was greatest: males evolved to have longer intromittent organs - penis-like structures - and females responded by evolving more pronounced ‘claws’ on their genitalia.
    Dr Paul Hopwood, of the University of Exeter, reveals: “Although we don’t know the ins and outs of how these genital structures relate to the reproductive success of each sex, our results show that sexual conflict over mating can lead to co-evolutionary changes in the shape of the genitals of burying beetles.”

     

    “Our research demonstrates the general importance of conflicts of interest between males and females in helping to generate some of the biodiversity that we see in the natural world.

     

    "It’s fascinating how genital evolution can happen so fast – in ten generations – showing how rapidly evolutionary changes can occur.”

     

    Read more »
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